• New York police, firefighters brawl during charity football game New York police, firefighters brawl during charity football game

    0 comments / Posted on by Chris Jackson

    A charity football game between members of New York City's police and fire departments ended in chaos Sunday when a controversial hit sparked two brawls on the field.

     

    The New York Post reported that the NYPD team was holding a comfortable 29-13 lead late in the fourth quarter when the FDNY's quarterback was tackled near the NYPD sideline. 

    The FDNY rushed across the field following the play, which did not result in a penalty. From there, matters degenerated into a series of physical and verbal confrontations, while coaches and fellow first responders tried to keep order. 

    "They hit our quarterback out of bounds, and that’s how things started," FDNY coach Steve Orr told the paper. "There were a lot of hotheads there."

     

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    The two sides were briefly separated, but the yelling continued and another fight broke out. Eventually the sides separated for good after the public address announcer reminded the teams they were taking part in a charity game.

    According to the Post, at least one firefighter was bloodied during the brawl and another was knocked to the ground. No serious injuries were reported.

    (Read more)

    A charity football game between members of New York City's police and fire departments ended in chaos Sunday when a controversial hit sparked two brawls on the field.

     

    The New York Post reported that the NYPD team was holding a comfortable 29-13 lead late in the fourth quarter when the FDNY's quarterback was tackled near the NYPD sideline. 

    The FDNY rushed across the field following the play, which did not result in a penalty. From there, matters degenerated into a series of physical and verbal confrontations, while coaches and fellow first responders tried to keep order. 

    "They hit our quarterback out of bounds, and that’s how things started," FDNY coach Steve Orr told the paper. "There were a lot of hotheads there."

     

    AMERICA!   

     AR Customs BALD EAGLE/ FLAG SOC

     

     

    The two sides were briefly separated, but the yelling continued and another fight broke out. Eventually the sides separated for good after the public address announcer reminded the teams they were taking part in a charity game.

    According to the Post, at least one firefighter was bloodied during the brawl and another was knocked to the ground. No serious injuries were reported.

    (Read more)

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  • Baltimore Police Officer found not guilty of all charges Baltimore Police Officer found not guilty of all charges

    0 comments / Posted on by Chris Jackson

    By  and Contact ReportersThe Baltimore Sun

     

    Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams rejected the state's case Monday against Officer Edward Nero, acquitting him on all counts for his role in the arrest of Freddie Gray.

    The verdict, which followed a five-day bench trial, is the first in the closely watched case. Nero, 30, had faced misdemeanor charges of second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and two counts of misconduct in office. The 25-year-old Gray died last year of injuries sustained while riding in the back of a police transport van.

     

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    Prosecutors argued that Nero committed an assault by detaining Gray without justification, while the reckless endangerment charge related to Nero's role in putting Gray into the arrest wagon without buckling a seat belt. In closing arguments Thursday, Williams had skeptically questioned prosecutors about their theory of assault, a theory legal experts said was unprecedented.

    In his ruling Monday, Williams said there were "no credible facts" to show that Nero was directly involved in Gray's arrest, and said testimony showed Nero's role in putting Gray in the van was minimized by the actions of others and not unreasonable given his training.

    "Based on the evidence presented, this court finds that the state has not met its burden to prove beyond a reasonable doubt all required elements of the crimes charged. Therefore, the verdict for each count is not guilty," Williams said.

     

     

    Continue here to read more

    By  and Contact ReportersThe Baltimore Sun

     

    Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams rejected the state's case Monday against Officer Edward Nero, acquitting him on all counts for his role in the arrest of Freddie Gray.

    The verdict, which followed a five-day bench trial, is the first in the closely watched case. Nero, 30, had faced misdemeanor charges of second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and two counts of misconduct in office. The 25-year-old Gray died last year of injuries sustained while riding in the back of a police transport van.

     

    Grunt Style Blue Line T-Shirt - Only $20.99 & Lifetime Warranty!

     

    Prosecutors argued that Nero committed an assault by detaining Gray without justification, while the reckless endangerment charge related to Nero's role in putting Gray into the arrest wagon without buckling a seat belt. In closing arguments Thursday, Williams had skeptically questioned prosecutors about their theory of assault, a theory legal experts said was unprecedented.

    In his ruling Monday, Williams said there were "no credible facts" to show that Nero was directly involved in Gray's arrest, and said testimony showed Nero's role in putting Gray in the van was minimized by the actions of others and not unreasonable given his training.

    "Based on the evidence presented, this court finds that the state has not met its burden to prove beyond a reasonable doubt all required elements of the crimes charged. Therefore, the verdict for each count is not guilty," Williams said.

     

     

    Continue here to read more

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  • Phrases people in the Military will know and Understand Phrases people in the Military will know and Understand

    0 comments / Posted on by Chris Jackson

    Every region of the US has its unique phrases

    , but they have nothing on the complex lexicon shared by people in the military.

    Our service members already set themselves apart by speaking in acronyms like "I was on the FOB when the IDF hit, so I radioed the TOC."

    Aside from acronyms, members of the military have special phrases that caught our attention.

    "15 minutes prior to 15 minutes prior"

    Military people learn to show up to everything (especially an official formation) at least 15 minutes early.

    The phrase "15 minutes prior to 15 minutes prior" comes from the expectation that you arrive 15 minutes earlier than the person in the next rank. The captain wants everyone to meet at 0600, so the master sergeant wants folks to arrive at 0545, and when it finally hits the corporal, people are told to show up at midnight.

    "A good piece of gear" (in reference to people)

    Only in the service is it acceptable to refer to one of your coworkers or (more frequently) a person working for you as "a good piece of gear."

    "Back on the block"

    This refers to the time before service, when a service member was a "nasty" civilian. ("Nasty" in the military generally means "unkempt.")

    Often used in reference to meeting old friends while on leave, as in a military member is "back on the block," or acting like a civilian.

    "Birth-control glasses"

    Military-issued eyeglasses known for their lack of aesthetic appeal. "Birth-control glasses" are considered ugly enough to function as contraceptives. 

    "Blues buddies"

    Blues are the name for the dress uniform for the Marine Corps, the Air Force, and occasionally the Navy dress and Winter Blue uniforms. Two personnel who frequently leave base together while dressed in their blues as known as "blues buddies." 

    "Blue falcon"

    Slang for "Buddy F-----."

    A Blue Falcon is someone who blatantly throws another Marine/soldier/sailor/airman under the bus.

    "Breaking it down Barney-style"

    Refers to the kid show "Barney and Friends." When something is broken down Barney style, it's being explained as if to a child.

    Continue reading more from http://www.businessinsider.com/phrases-only-people-in-the-military-know-2014-10

    Every region of the US has its unique phrases

    , but they have nothing on the complex lexicon shared by people in the military.

    Our service members already set themselves apart by speaking in acronyms like "I was on the FOB when the IDF hit, so I radioed the TOC."

    Aside from acronyms, members of the military have special phrases that caught our attention.

    "15 minutes prior to 15 minutes prior"

    Military people learn to show up to everything (especially an official formation) at least 15 minutes early.

    The phrase "15 minutes prior to 15 minutes prior" comes from the expectation that you arrive 15 minutes earlier than the person in the next rank. The captain wants everyone to meet at 0600, so the master sergeant wants folks to arrive at 0545, and when it finally hits the corporal, people are told to show up at midnight.

    "A good piece of gear" (in reference to people)

    Only in the service is it acceptable to refer to one of your coworkers or (more frequently) a person working for you as "a good piece of gear."

    "Back on the block"

    This refers to the time before service, when a service member was a "nasty" civilian. ("Nasty" in the military generally means "unkempt.")

    Often used in reference to meeting old friends while on leave, as in a military member is "back on the block," or acting like a civilian.

    "Birth-control glasses"

    Military-issued eyeglasses known for their lack of aesthetic appeal. "Birth-control glasses" are considered ugly enough to function as contraceptives. 

    "Blues buddies"

    Blues are the name for the dress uniform for the Marine Corps, the Air Force, and occasionally the Navy dress and Winter Blue uniforms. Two personnel who frequently leave base together while dressed in their blues as known as "blues buddies." 

    "Blue falcon"

    Slang for "Buddy F-----."

    A Blue Falcon is someone who blatantly throws another Marine/soldier/sailor/airman under the bus.

    "Breaking it down Barney-style"

    Refers to the kid show "Barney and Friends." When something is broken down Barney style, it's being explained as if to a child.

    Continue reading more from http://www.businessinsider.com/phrases-only-people-in-the-military-know-2014-10

    Read more